Spring Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

SPRING 2020 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:  

Please download the PDF version of our undergraduate course flier for Spring 2020 here.

 

GWS 200:  SEX & POWER               
SECTIONS:   001: MWF 1:00-1:50PM           002: TR 9:30-10:45AM                    

How does sex impact our sense of power? How is power forged through sexual imagery and sexual relationships? When does your sex set limits on your leisure, education, and earning power? Do you need real analysis instead of soundbites for explaining social inequalities between the sexes? This course addresses these key issues in GWS through a social science perspective that is cross-cultural, transnational, and interdisciplinary in its approach. It will cover such topics as identity and identity politics, sexuality and reproduction, labor and the gender politics of the workplace, health and health activism, feminist thought and action, gendered forms of violence and organized resistance, and the everyday experience of gender. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of gender with other social categories, such as race, nationality, class, and sexual orientation. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 200-003: SEX & POWER
INSTRUCTOR: FRANCES HENDERSON     MWF 9:00-9:50AM

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of both Gender Studies and Women's Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women’s studies, feminist studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological. Students will use gender-based theory to look at the ways in which gender identification and representation influences individuals and societies. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) scholarship, both historical and contemporary.  This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR:  ELIZABETH WILLIAMS     LECTURE: MW 2:00-2:50PM                                           

DISCUSSION SECTIONS: (001) W 1:00-1:50PM  (002) F 12:00-12:50PM  (003) F 2:00-2:50PM
Sex scandals have proven to be an enduring part of political discourse from the ancient times to the present. The first Roman Emperor, Augustus, exiled his daughter Julia after her philandering discredited his moral reforms; during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette was accused of sleeping with men, women, and even her own son; and more recently, an unverified report from Buzzfeed involving Donald Trump and certain Moscow mattresses raised eyebrows and ire. Although sex scandals are often dismissed as lurid distractions from “real” political issues, in this course we will take them seriously as elements of political discourse. Through a close study of a number of political sex scandals, both past and present, students will consider the following questions: How and why are issues of sexuality morality tied to political legitimacy? Why is sex a useful discourse for expressing political discontent? How do issues of race, class, religion, and region influence the shape of sex scandals? This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-004: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE    
INSTRUCTOR:  FRANCES HENDERSON     MWF 11:00-11:50AM

Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender and Women's Studies, examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women, and explores the lives, achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-201: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
DISTANCE LEARNING-ONLINE COURSE
PART OF TERM:  MARCH 9-MAY 8

Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender and Women's Studies, examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women, and explores the lives, achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 300-001: TOPICS IN GWS: GENDER AND DISABILITY  
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD TR 3:30-4:45PM
This interdisciplinary course is informed by the notion that disability is socially constructed, materially experienced, profoundly political, raced, gendered, and classed. The aim of this course is for students to develop and learn to employ a feminist disability studies lens in order to critically analyze how ableism has structured certain bodyminds as “less than,” “unruly,” “mad,” and/or “disposable.” We will also be looking to bodies that may or may not be normatively defined as “disabled,” but who deviate from the “normative body.” We will consider: how has disability, as a political and analytical category, been deployed by the state to manage and control deviant bodies and police the boundaries of ideal citizenship? How do certain bodies become defined as “good” bodies, happy bodies, desirable bodies? How can we envision a disability future? What bodies have been constructed as deserving to live/die/reproduce/be born? How do heteronormativity and disability intersect? What disabled bodies are valuable to this iteration of capitalism? And, what does gender have to do with all of this? This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 300-002 TOPICS IN GWS: GENDER IN COMICS              
INSTRUCTOR: JEORG SAUER     MWF 2:00-2:50PM

Underground Comix artists from the 1960s have used the medium of comics to explore issues of gender in ways that main stream comics would not permit.  The artists have dealt with issues portraying violence, sexism, health problems, and the impact of gender on relationships. In sum, women comics artists explored how gender was culturally constructed and the lived experiences of people varied because of those cultural situations. This course will examine and explore contemporary comics and artists representations of gender in varying genres of storytelling—from fiction to autobiography. Course grades will be based on an analytic paper, a comics reading journal, and a research paper. This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 302-001 GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: TRANSNATIONAL SEXUALITIES
INSTRUCTOR:  CHARLIE ZHANG   TR 12:30-1:45PM

This course examines the politics of sexualities within a transnational frame of analysis and explores the process of “border-crossings” through critical engagements of normative and non-normative sexualities. Using cross-cultural research on sexuality studies, the course will address these key questions: as bodies move across national, cultural, racial, and ideological borders, how is sexuality redefined, named, and leveraged for change? What factors allow for new formations and understandings of sexuality to emerge within an increasingly globalized world? How do social forces such as nationalism, citizenship, global neoliberalism, settle colonialism, and mass media shape and produce desires, sexual identities, sexual labor, sexual practices, bodies and genders? Students will learn key concepts used in discussions of transnational sexuality studies to expand their understanding of intersectional analysis. Topics for study include: queer and LGBTQI organizing; expression of sexual identities, desires, and practices across nation-state borders; queer migration and labor flows; transnational porn industries; sex trafficking and tourism; settler colonialism; and movements for reproductive justice. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics.

GWS 309-201: HEALTH, HISTORY, AND HUMAN DIVERSITY
INSTRUCTOR:  MELISSA STEIN
DISTANCE LEARNING-ONLINE COURSE

Health care reform is in the news every day, and everyone has an opinion on why the system is broken, how to fix it, who should have access to good medical care, under what circumstances, and what constitutes “good care” in the first place. This online, multi-format course will consider what it has meant to be a good patient or a good doctor at various points in American history, who was included—and excluded—in each group, how medicine became professionalized, and how people have organized around issues of individual or public health. Students will interactively engage with a range of primary sources, watch presentations and related films, have the opportunity to ask the professor questions and seek assistance during designated virtual “office hours” via Skype, and participate in online moderated discussions of the assigned readings and films, and at the end of each unit, of the questions it raised about medical practice and ethics.  This course fulfills requirements for the Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate major and minor, and the Sexuality Studies certificate.

GWS 350-001  INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST THEORIZING            
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD TR 9:30-10:45AM

This interdisciplinary course aims to provide students with an overview of feminist theoretical frameworks, such as feminist disability theory, black feminist theory, intersectionality, transnational feminist theory, and feminist affect theory. We will work to come to understand what these feminist theoretical tools mean as well as utilize these theoretical tools to analyze our contemporary social world. This course also considers how developments in queer theory and trans studies have informed feminist thinking and theorizing. This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 410-001 INTRODUCTION TO QUEER THEORY
INSTRUCTOR:  CHARLIE ZHANG            TR 11:00-12:15AM

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which queer studies intersect with other fields of critical inquiries, including feminism, critical race theory, poststructuralism, transgender studies, Marxist political economy, decolonization and postcolonial theory, studies of transnationalism and globalization, and environmental studies. Through these theoretical lenses, we will engage the production of queer theory by drawing linkages between queerness, racial formation, performativity and subjectivity, temporalities, ecologies, transgender and intersex, urbanization and gentrification, settler colonialism and neocolonial domination, transnational labor migration and tourism, and global capitalism. Applying queer theory to political debates, films, music and other cultural products, students will improve their critical understanding of human diversities and social justice in a transnational context. This course fulfills requirements for the Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate major and minor, and the Sexuality Studies certificate.

GWS 430-001: GENDER, POWER, AND VIOLENCE              
INSTRUCTOR:  SRIMATI BASU       TR 12:30-1:45PM

This course examines the relations between the three terms gender, power and violence. We will read some conceptual pieces on gender and power, and a number of  studies of  gender-based violence drawing on a variety of disciplines, then analyze laws and policies addressing such violence. You will also work on an independent project where you apply these theories and studies to your scholarly or field research. The course is interdisciplinary and transnational in its scope, and examines scales of violence from intimate to community to State, bodily to psychological, economic to cultural.  This course fulfills requirements for the Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate major and minor, and the Sexuality Studies certificate.

GWS 599-001  SEMINAR IN GWS: CAPSTONE     
INSTRUCTOR:  SRIMATI BASU    T 2:30-5:00PM

The GWS Senior Seminar is a Capstone course where you synthesize what you have learnt about the research, methods and theories of Gender and Women’s Studies in a few different ways: you will be reflecting on the ways in which one puts together an argument and writes as a GWS scholar, and thinking through and applying some debates in the field. You will do this by writing a senior thesis in the form of a journal article, editing the articles of other students, and formally presenting your research to an audience of GWS faculty and students. Alongside, you will be reading and discussing materials which consider various approaches to research and writing in GWS.  This course is required for GWS majors.
 

ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT

AS 300-201:  SPECIAL TOPICS: GWS BOOK CLUB
INSTRUCTOR:  DEIRDRE MIKOLAJCIK     ONLINE
THIS IS A 1-CREDIT, ONLINE, PART OF TERM COURSE (MARCH 9-MAY 8)

Students will be introduced to gender related discourse through reading assigned books and related materials which illustrate gender themes and intersections with other social and cultural locations. Students will read two assigned books and associated materials in order to write blog posts about each book, respond to discussion prompts in writing a long paper on each book, and writing a paper comparing and contrasting the books on assigned topics. After completing this course, the student will be able to: 1. Describe the themes of gender in the assigned books and their cultural significance. 2. Analyze the impact of gender on the lives of people in the assigned books. 3. Summarize and interpret how gender is important to understanding the assigned books, the cultural context in which they were written, and how gender intersects with other identities and social locations
 

HIS 355-001:  WOMEN IN MODERN JAPAN: CITIZENSHIP, EQUALITY, PEACE
INSTRUCTOR: AKIKO TAKENAKA     TR 11:00-12:15
This course covers the history of women’s activism in 20-21C Japan. Readings will include writings by and interviews with the activists (in translation) as well as historiographical and analytical secondary sources. Topics covered will include suffrage and citizenship, gender equality, welfare for mothers and children, women’s liberation movement, and anti-war activism. The latter half of the course will place an emphasis on the impact of U.S. Cold War on peace activism and gender relations in Japan. 

KHP 220-002: SEXUALITY EDUCATION
INSTRUCTOR:  KRISTEN MARK     MW 12:00-1:40

This course is designed to prepare educators to teach inclusive comprehensive medically accurate sexuality education in the schools and beyond. It is also designed to provide content and strategies that could be applied to sex education more broadly, such as in a college setting, parenting, in the media, etc. Emphasis is placed on justification of sexuality education, relevant content, inclusivity and diversity, appropriate teaching techniques, and precautions to take when teaching sexuality education.

KHP 576-001:  LGBTQ* HEALTH PROMOTION
KRISTEN MARK     T 4:00-6:30

This course is an intensive seminar on contemporary health issues particularly relevant to LGBTQ* populations. Research, theoretical, and substantive issues relevant to studying LGBTQ* health will be covered. Students will critically evaluate LGBTQ* health education programs (and lack thereof) in school and community settings, LGBTQ* health research, develop depth and breadth of understanding key issues in LGBTQ* health promotion, and learn the various forms of inquiry used in the study of LGBTQ* health.

UKC 182:  PHILOSOPHY, LAW AND THE #ME TOO MOVEMENT
INSTRUCTOR:  NATALIE NENADIC     TR 3:30-4:45

The #Me Too Movement has recently captured the public consciousness as years of unpunished incidences of sexual harassment and assault by high profile figures have come to light and triggered a social media tsunami by scores of other victims coming forward with similar experiences. The course will examine this social and political phenomenon and the implications that it might have on our own lives. We will address questions such as: What are sexual harassment and assault? How has our understanding of them changed over time? What are their relation to civil rights? What impediments are there to seeking justice? What is the role of law in this pursuit? The course explores this issue through focusing on its philosophical dimensions, which also introduces students to what philosophy is and to is central relevance to such problems. We will address philosophical topics such as existentialism, phenomenology, concept formation, human oppression, freedom, human nature, and ethics, among others. Throughout, we will explore the role and limits of law in seeking justice for these violations.

WRD 308: VISUAL RHETORIC
INSTRUCTOR:  KARRIEANN SOTO VEGA     TR 12:30-1:45

This course introduces visual rhetoric, covering its history, current practice, and possible futures. Utilizing the disciplinary tools of rhetoric, students will compose in textual and visual modes, learning a variety of methods with which to create and critique visuals. Emphasis will be given to intersectionality and representational politics in visual rhetorics.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.

WRD 420: RHETORICAL TRADITIONS: CULTURAL RHETORICS
INSTRUCTOR:  KARRIEANN SOTO VEGA     TBD

This course offers a detailed examination of the history and theory of a specific rhetorical tradition or group of traditions. In this course, students will gain familiarity with key concepts and terms in the cultural rhetorics tradition, compare and contrast culturally situated definitions of rhetoric, and better understand the way rhetorical historiography influences how rhetorical traditions are defined and taught. Approaches to be studied and practiced include feminist, decolonial, and identity-based and geopolitically-oriented cultural rhetorics. Repeatable up to 6 credit hours under different subtitles. Prereq: Completion of WRD 200-level course or above or consent of the instructor.

 

 

 

X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading