Spring Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

SPRING 2021 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:  

Please download the PDF version of our undergraduate course flier for Spring 2021 here.

 

 

**PLEASE NOTE**
Students must be available during the scheduled course days and times for synchronous class meetings.
If the course is online only and will have synchronous meetings, the instructor will
post the synchronous meeting schedule.
If the course is hybrid, then the instructor will post a schedule of dates the course will meet in person, and dates the course will meet online.
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GWS 150-201:  READING GENDER
INSTRUCTOR:  TBD
MEETING DATES:  PART OF TERM (2nd 8 weeks of the spring semester, 3/22-5/14)
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, ASYNCHRONOUS

Students will be introduced to gender and sexuality topics through reading three assigned books and related materials, and reflecting on those materials through written assignments and online discussion. The books will illustrate themes and intersections of gender with other social and cultural locations through contemporary books. 

GWS 200-001:  SEX & POWER
INSTRUCTOR:  FRANCES HENDERSON

MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, MWF 10:00-10:50AM (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of both Gender Studies and Women's Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women’s studies, feminist studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological. Students will use gender-based theory to look at the ways in which gender identification and representation influences individuals and societies. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 200-201: SEX & POWER
INSTRUCTOR: ALINA HECHLER
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, ASYNCHRONOUS

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of both Gender Studies and Women's Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women’s studies, feminist studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological. Students will use gender-based theory to look at the ways in which gender identification and representation influences individuals and societies. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) scholarship, both historical and contemporary.  This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-001: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE        
INSTRUCTOR:  ELIZABETH WILLIAMS    

MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, MWF 1:00-1:50PM (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)
This course examines a particular subset of popular culture: sex scandals! Sex scandals have proven to be an enduring part of political discourse from the ancient times to the present. The first Roman Emperor, Augustus, exiled his daughter Julia after her philandering discredited his moral reforms; during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette was accused of sleeping with men, women, and even her own son; and more recently, an unverified report from Buzzfeed involving Donald Trump and certain Moscow mattresses raised eyebrows and ire. Although sex scandals are often dismissed as lurid distractions from “real” political issues, in this course we will take them seriously as elements of political discourse. Through a close study of a number of political sex scandals, both past and present, students will consider the following questions: How and why are issues of sexuality morality tied to political legitimacy? Why is sex a useful discourse for expressing political discontent? How do issues of race, class, religion, and region influence the shape of sex scandals? This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-201 GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE    
INSTRUCTOR:  FRANCES HENDERSON    
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, ASYNCHRONOUS

Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender and Women's Studies, examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women, and explores the lives, achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 250-001: SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
INSTRUCTOR: MIKAELA FEROLI
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, TR 9:30-10:45 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This course takes you through some ways in which people have organized themselves around local, national, and international issues pertaining to gender. We engage key theories that explain the origins, strategies, and success of different forms of social movements across the world. We also critically analyze case studies from different parts of the world to understand how social movements work on the ground and in specific cultural environments with unique historical trajectories, attending to ways in which social movements are shaped by, and do or do not result in changes to social structures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. This course is required for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 300-001 (same as PSY 375): TOPICS IN GWS: PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
INSTRUCTOR:  JENN HUNT
MEETING TIMES:  HYBRID, MWF 1:00-1:50  (This course will meet in person and online)

This course examines psychological research and theory related to gender, with a focus on the ways in which gender impacts people’s daily lives. We will begin by discussing femininity, masculinity, the problems of assuming gender/sex binaries, and how gender intersects with other social identities. Then, we will investigate the origins of gender by considering social, cognitive, and biological influences on gender development. Next, we will learn about gender stereotypes and sexism, contrasting them with research that examines the characteristics and abilities of women and men. In the second half of the class, we will use this knowledge to assess how gender affects several important life domains including work, violence, relationships, sexuality, and body image. Throughout the course, we will examine how gender can be studied using feminist empirical research methods and emphasize the importance of race, ethnicity, culture, and social class in understanding gender.

GWS 301-001 (same as AAS 400):  CROSSROADS: BLACK GIRL STUDIES        
INSTRUCTOR: FRANCES HENDERSON
MEETING TIMES:  HYBRID, MW 12:00-12:50, F TBD (This course will meet in person and online)

This course will introduce students to girls studies and will provide an overview of the field with a focus on Black girls’ experience in the United States.  Studying black girls is an important lens through which to understand race, gender, class, sexuality and ability in the USA.  Particular attention will be paid to the impacts of socialization, representation, marginalization and inclusion/exclusion of black girls and young women as they move through the world in a racially gendered body. Central to this will be developing a critical analysis of wider assumptions about seriousness and play, race and privilege, purity, weakness and power. In this course students will be asked to engage in inquiry and dialogue around several areas, including: consumption, representation, violence, subjectivity and black feminist agency, mental health, and black girl magic and joy through an intersectional lens. This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors, and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Community, Culture, and U.S. Citizenship.

GWS 302-001 GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: MASCULINITIES
INSTRUCTOR:  SRIMATI BASU
MEETING DATES:  PART OF TERM, 1/25-3/19
MEETING TIMES: HYBRID, MW 3:00-4:30PM & TBD (This course will meet in person and online
)

This course examines constructions of gender by looking to constructions of masculinity. Who is a man? How do they become one, or maintain being one? How do age, race, caste, religion, nationality and class affect what it means to be a man? How does sexuality write itself upon masculinities? We will explore these questions by reading and watching the work of historians, ethnographers, journalists, creative writers and filmmakers. Students will respond to readings through response essays and exams, and work in a group to design a final multimedia project.  Interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational examination of issues of gender focused around particular themes and locations. Thematic focus explicating gender which also illuminates questions of history and political economy in specific locations. Introduces students to research and a variety of analytical questions in the field, as well as the interaction between locales/people and structural processes. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics. This class has both synchronous and asynchronous meetings. We will meet as a class synchronously, every day during the term, on Mondays and Wednesdays. In addition, there will be asynchronous content for you to read/ watch, and respond to, and asynchronous group meetings to work on your final projects.

GWS 302-201:  GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE
INSTRUCTOR:  CAROL MASON
MEETING DATES:  PART OF TERM, 1/26-3/18
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE  TR 3:30-6:00 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

 A group of African American women planning to attend the International Conference on Population and Development in Egypt coined the phrase “reproductive justice” as a way to assert their perspectives as women of color, mothers, health care advocates, human rights champions, and political organizers. Reproductive justice therefore began as a transnational, antiracist, and activist concept. That was 30 years ago and, since then, organizations and academics have adopted the RJ mode of analysis to understand issues such as coerced sterilization, surrogacy, infant mortality, the right to parent, family separation, abortion, infertility treatment, contraception, and more. We will examine these global issues and learn about the amazing women who fight for reproductive justice. This 8-week online course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors, and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics.

GWS 309-201 (same as CPH 309): HEALTH, HISTORY, AND HUMAN DIVERSITY
INSTRUCTOR:  MELISSA STEIN
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE, ASYNCHRONOUS

Health care reform is in the news every day, and everyone has an opinion on why the system is broken, how to fix it, who should have access to good medical care, under what circumstances, and what constitutes “good care” in the first place. This online, multi-format course will consider what it has meant to be a good patient or a good doctor at various points in American history, who was included—and excluded—in each group, how medicine became professionalized, and how people have organized around issues of individual or public health. Students will interactively engage with a range of primary sources, watch presentations and related films, have the opportunity to ask the professor questions and seek assistance during designated virtual “office hours” via Skype, and participate in online moderated discussions of the assigned readings and films, and at the end of each unit, of the questions it raised about medical practice and ethics.  This course fulfills requirements for the Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate major and minor, and the Sexuality Studies certificate.

GWS 340-001:  HISTORY OF FEMINIST THOUGHT
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE, ASYNCHRONOUS

This course investigates historical flashpoints in feminist thought up until the late 1970s. Our goal is to weave together multiple histories, epistemologies, and narratives on order to explore the genesis of feminist thought and create an (imperfect) feminist archive that holds the theoretical contributions of feminist thinkers, activists, and intellectuals pre-1980. Our task to explore feminist thought to 1975, as the title of this class suggests, is inherently flawed. We necessarily will encounter gaps and participate in erasure as we construct this archive. As Foucault has argued, archives are normative and normalizing. Thus, we will also participate in a project of deconstruction alongside our project of construction. We will read primary and secondary sources that are not generally included in a traditional Gender and Women’s Studies canon of historical thought and ask how these texts inform, expose, transform, and challenge our understanding of feminism and feminist theory. This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 350-001  INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST THEORY
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE, TR 2:00-3:15PM (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This interdisciplinary course aims to provide students with an overview of feminist theoretical frameworks, such as feminist disability theory, black feminist theory, intersectionality, transnational feminist theory, and feminist affect theory. We will work to come to understand what these feminist theoretical tools mean as well as utilize these theoretical tools to analyze our contemporary social world. This course also considers how developments in queer theory and trans studies have informed feminist thinking and theorizing. This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 410-001 INTRODUCTION TO QUEER THEORY
INSTRUCTOR:  CHARLIE ZHANG           
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, MWF 11:00-11:50 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which queer studies intersects with other fields of critical inquiries, including feminism, critical race theory, poststructuralism, transgender studies, Marxist political economy, decolonization and postcolonial theory, and studies of transnationalism and globalization. Through these theoretical lenses, we will engage the production of queer theory by drawing linkages between queerness, racial formation, performativity and subjectivity, temporalities, transgender and intersex, urbanization and gentrification, settler colonialism and neocolonial domination, transnational labor migration and tourism, and global capitalism. Applying queer theory to political debates, films, music and other cultural products, students will improve their critical understanding of human diversities and social justice in a transnational context. This course fulfills requirements for the Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate major and minor, and the Sexuality Studies certificate.

GWS 595-001:  ISSUES IN GWS: AMERICAN FICTIONS OF THE 1970’S- 
INSTRUCTOR: CAROL MASON
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, M 4:00-6:30PM (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This seminar critically examines three right-wing cultural narratives taking influential form in the 1970s whose legacies impact us today: the Invisible Government; the Militant Homosexual; and the Northwest Imperative. We will read primary materials from right-wing movements contextualized with secondary sources by scholars to understand the bases for current conspiratorial fictions known as “deep state,” “gender ideology,” and the “great replacement.” In this way we will be poised to analyze comparatively the concept of “America” as it manifested in 1970s politics and popular culture of the United States and as it currently transcends national boundaries in the midst of a global rise of the right. Tertiary sources will therefore include cultural and feminist studies of the 1970s as well as American Studies guides to interdisciplinary analysis. THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED FOR SPRING 2021

GWS 595-002 (same as AAS 400):  ISSUES IN GWS: BLACK FEMINISMS
INSTRUCTOR:  NICOLE MARTIN
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, W 4:00-6:30 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This course investigates the historical context, theoretical tenets, and everyday practice of Black women’s social, political, intellectual, and creative lives. By emphasizing Black feminisms in its plurality, we make critical space for the specificity of Black feminist expression across nationality, sexual orientation, socioeconomics and gendered presentation. Over the course of the semester, we will become familiar with and draw from an array of texts including novels, theatrical productions, scholarly writing, films, music, and poetry. This range of artifacts will allow us to traverse disciplinary boundaries and access multiple entry points for our discussions of Black women’s activism, spirituality, kinship, Diasporic sensibilities, and articulations of futurity. Permission from the instructor is required for enrollment in this course.  Please contact  nicolemartin@uky.edu

GWS 599-001  SEMINAR IN GWS: CAPSTONE         
INSTRUCTOR:  MELISSA STEIN
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE, F 12:00-2:30 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

The GWS Senior Seminar is a Capstone course where you synthesize what you have learnt about the research, methods and theories of Gender and Women’s Studies in a few different ways: you will be reflecting on the ways in which one puts together an argument and writes as a GWS scholar, and thinking through and applying some debates in the field. You will do this by writing a senior thesis in the form of a journal article, editing the articles of other students, and formally presenting your research to an audience of GWS faculty and students. Alongside, you will be reading and discussing materials which consider various approaches to research and writing in GWS.  This course is required for GWS majors.
 

ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT


HIS 355 003 (Same as JPN 405): WOMEN IN MODERN JAPAN: CITIZENSHIP, EQUITY, PEACE
INSTRUCTOR:  AKIKO TAKENAKA
MEETING TIMES: HYBRID,   TR 2:00-3:15PM (This course will meet in person and online)
This course involves a critical examination of women’s lives and experiences in modern Japan (late 19C to the present). Readings will include writings by and interviews with Japanese women (in translation) as well as historiographical and analytical secondary sources. Topics covered will include education, suffrage and citizenship, gender equality, war, women’s liberation movement, and anti-war activism. We will begin by examining difficulties and obstacles that Japanese women face today, and then look back to the past to identify problems and trends that may have contributed to today’s issues. Through readings, discussions, and final paper/presentation, we will discuss difficulties that women have encountered—and continue to encounter—not just in Japan but also elsewhere, and explore possibilities for reducing gender-based discriminations.

SPA 464: LATINA/X AMERICAN WOMEN FICTION WRITERS CONFRONT THE 21ST CENTURY  
INSTRUCTOR:  DIERDRA REBER
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE, MWF 11:00-12:00
For the past ten years, a new generation of predominantly 30s- and 40s-something women writers hailing from across Latin America and the Latina/o/x US have been crafting “ghost stor[ies] for the real world,” “psychological realism, science fiction, comedy and horror, fantasy and fabulism” whose narrative modalities include “psychological menace,” “black magic,” “physical and metaphysical blindness,” and “dangerous games that blur the line between love and violence.”  Often categorized as “speculative fiction,” their works are populated with “broken souls,” “toxins,” “drugs,” “pain,” “disappearance,” “psychopathic cannibal[s],” “Siamese fighting fish, cockroaches, cats, snakes, [and] strange fungus” in apartment buildings and libraries, on road trips and space travel, at the Mexico-US border and in the Antilles, across time in the past, present, and future.  One author is likened by critics to a “psychoanalyst in a planetary refugee camp.”  These authors play with horror, magic, and the weird to render fierce social criticism from their narrative exposition of material realties about relationships, affect, power, economic realities, and the prospects for self-determination and decolonization of the feminist subject.  As a genre, the short story is making a marked comeback with this generational cohort, and it will be our principal focus, fundamentally considering how these works address contemporary realities from a literary platform.  From their collective literary vantage point, what does it mean to be a contemporary Latin/x American woman?  Class discussion will be conducted in Spanish; course materials will be availabile in both Spanish and English.  If language is an issue for enrollment, please email Dr. Reber to discuss: dierdra.reber@uky.edu. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussion, write frequent short critical reactions to readings, give one or more in-class presentations, and write a final analytical essay.

 

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