Spring Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

SPRING 2018 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:  
Please download the PDF version of our undergraduate course flier for Spring 2018.

GWS 200: Sex and Power How does sex impact our sense of power? How is power forged through sexual imagery and sexual relationships? When does your sex set limits on your leisure, education, and earning power? Do you need real analysis instead of soundbites for explaining social inequalities between the sexes? This course addresses these key issues in GWS through a social science perspective that is cross-cultural, transnational, and interdisciplinary in its approach. It will cover such topics as identity and identity politics, sexuality and reproduction, labor and the gender politics of the workplace, health and health activism, feminist thought and action, gendered forms of violence and organized resistance, and the everyday experience of gender. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of gender with other social categories, such as race, nationality, class, and sexual orientation. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 200-001:  TBA, TR 9:30-10:45am
GWS 200-002:  TBA, MWF 10:00-10:50am

GWS 201:  Gender and Popular Culture:  Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender   and Women's Studies, examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women, and explores the lives, achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors. 
TBA, MW 12:00-12:50pm lecture plus your choice of discussion session:  GWS 201-001: M 2:00-2:50pm  I  GWS 201-002: W 2:00-2:50pm  I GWS 201-003: F 12:00-12:50pm

GWS 201:  Gender and Popular Culture:  Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender and Women's Studies, examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women, and explores the lives, achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.
Sections:
GWS 201-004: MWF 11:00-11:50am
GWS 201-005: MWF 12:00-12:50pm

GWS 301-001: Crossroads: Women Who Don’t Behave: Politics, Bodies, and Mythologies: Anne Helen Petersen, in her recent book Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud explores some of the many sides of the non-conforming woman who simply will not behave herself as expected.  In my own work, I’ve described her as the woman who is punished for being “too much”: She might be perceived as too loud, too ambitious, too fat, too shrill, too “masculine,” too aggressive, too pushy, too slutty, too greedy for love, too concerned with her own power.…the list is virtually endless. What they all have in common: transgression of norms that still persist in cultural notions of what a woman should be like, and as a result suffer branding, marginalizing, caricaturing, and sometimes even death.  In this course, we will read my own recent books on Anne Boleyn—one of the most famous “too slutty, too ambitious” women who paid the highest price for her refusal to do what was expected of her—and Hillary Clinton, as well as comedian Lindy West’s memoir Shrill and selected chapters from Samantha Irby’s We are Never Meeting in Real Life, Roxane Gay’s Hunger, Anne Helen Peterson’s Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman, and my own Unbearable Weight. Format, written assignments, and other possible projects to be determined, dependent on enrollment.  Susan Bordo, MW 4:30-5:45

GWS 302-001: Gender Across the World: Kaleidoscope of Gender in the Global South: This course will focus on the challenges of defining gender, race, and identity in a holistic way in the Global South. For that purpose, students will investigate the pervasiveness of stereotypes in literature, film and the media-specifically in Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America and Asia. Nowadays, the media can be a powerful vehicle for change; however, too often, it does not merely maintain but reinforces the status quo, particularly in the Global South. Through a thorough analysis of what the global community can learn from best practices, students will develop methods to best support a positive revaluation of gender and race representations. This will involve delving into misrepresentations in literature and popular culture. In so doing, we will be examining theory from the Global South to avoid the simplification of Eurocentric type analysis.  Jacqueline Couti, TR 2:00-3:15pm

GWS 340-001:  History of Feminist Thought. This course is designed to provide students with an historical overview of the cultural diversity, creative and theoretical expression, and defining moments in the development of feminist thought up to 1975. Texts will include works, such as that of Hypatia, Christine De Pizan, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, and Mary Astell, that pre-date the term feminist but that are pioneering statements in the struggle for gender equality. “Thought“ will include political manifestos, poetry, and short stories, as well as classic works of feminist theory and cultural criticism. TBA, TR 3:30-4:45pm.  This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 410:  Introduction to Queer Theory:  This course is designed to provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which queer studies intersect with other fields of critical inquiries, including feminism, critical race theory, poststructuralism, transgender studies, Marxist political economy, decolonization and postcolonial theory, disability studies, studies of transnationalism and globalization, and environmental studies. Through these theoretical lenses, we will engage the production of queer theory by drawing linkages between queerness, racial formation, performativity and subjectivity, queer temporalities, transgender and intersex, disability, urbanization and gentrification, settler colonialism and neocolonial domination, transnational labor migration and tourism, and global capitalism. Applying queer theory to political debates, films, music and other cultural products, students will improve their critical understanding of human diversities and social justice in a transnational context. This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors and the sexuality studies certificate. Charlie Zhang, MW 3:00-4:15PM.

GWS 506-001:  History of Sexuality in the U.S.:  Covering a broad chronological scope, from the colonial period to the present, this course is designed to introduce students to the major themes, debates, and developments in the history of sexuality in the United States. Given this large scope, the course will not be exhaustive, but rather offer a representative sample of key moments and issues in the history of sexuality. Particular attention will be paid to the roles that gender, race, culture, and class play in shaping ideas about and experiences of sex and sexuality. In recent years, scholars have come to understand sexual expression and sexual categories not as static, objective, or natural realities, but as social constructions. Thus, during the course, we will continually interrogate the term “sexuality,” and the changing meanings and expectations associated with the category across various cultural and historical contexts. In addition, this course will explore several themes throughout the semester, including: Reproduction and reproductive control; Regulation of gender, sex, and bodies; Laws and cultural norms regarding sex, marriage, and cross-cultural encounters; Changing ideas about sexuality in science and popular culture; Violence and power; and Sexual variation, identity, and identity politics. This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors and the sexuality studies certificate. Melissa Stein, TR 11:00-12:15

GWS 599-001:  Senior Seminar in GWS- Capstone: This course provides a space for students to synthesize what   they have learned about the methods and theories of GWS in a few different ways. Students will reflect on the ways in which one puts together an argument and writes as an interdisciplinary scholar on gender or women. Students will do this by writing a senior thesis and editing the theses of other students, and reading and discussing some materials which deal with research and writing in GWS. Prereq: Must be a declared major or minor in junior or senior year, or have written permission of the Chair in an exceptional circumstance. This course is required for GWS majors.  Carol Mason, T 1:00-3:30pm

HIS 355:  Topics in Non-Western History: Women and Gender in Latin America: Although Latin America is known as the land of machismo, ten women have already served as president in different countries. The paintings of Frida Kahlo, the Mexican artist, go for the highest price of any female artist in all of the Americas. The seventeenth-century Mexican nun, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, was the hemisphere’s pioneer in the struggle for women’s rights and the mothers of the Plaza de Mayo were instrumental in the overthrow of the military dictatorship in Argentina in 1983. This class will explore femininity, masculinity, and gender relations south of the border, and deconstruct common stereotypes along the way.  We will use a rich variety of readings (testimonials, literary works, and biographies), documentaries, and films in order to understand how people’s lives have changed over time.  Francie Chassen-Lopez, TR 2:00-3:15pm.

SOC 335:  Sociology of Gender-- The sociological study of gender as a socially and culturally constructed phenomenon, with particular emphasis on the intersection of gender inequalities with inequalities of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexualities. Instructor: TBD, MW 3:30-4:45

SOC 435 Gender & Mental Health -- A sociological analysis of the gendered nature of mental health, including topics such as gendered mental health disparities and gender differences in mental health care.  Instructor: TBD, TR 11-12:15

 

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