Spring Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

SPRING 2022 GRADUATE COURSES:  

GWS 600-001: TOPICS IN GWS:  FEMINISM, CAPITALISM, CRISIS, & SOCIALISM
INSTRUCTOR: KAREN TICE
MEETING TIMES:  R 4:30-7:00

We will explore historical trajectories, contemporary connections, debates, and the frictions that have characterized feminist engagements with capitalism and socialism from a variety of geo-political locations. We will examine the following questions: Is feminism and socialism compatible? How have they been related to each other and how have they been at odds?  How have changing configurations of capitalism, neo-liberalism, globalization, affective economies, crisis, state socialism, and socialist feminism shaped feminist struggles, critiques, and affinities? How have intersectional hierarchies and differences shaped the relationship between feminism and anti-capitalist, anti-imperialism, and anti-colonialism struggles. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate.


GWS 650-001:  FEMINIST THEORY
INSTRUCTOR: ARIA HALLIDAY
MEETING TIMES:  T 3:30-6:00

This is an interdisciplinary course addressing issues in contemporary feminist theory (such as intersections of race and gender, the body, ideology and representation, sexuality, etc.).

This Feminist Theory course will consider the history and contemporary arguments within Black feminist theory. Discussing topics related to digital culture, the body and pornography, religion and faith, and disability, students will engage debates that will shape the future of feminism and our global culture.  This course is required for GWS PhD and GWS graduate certificate students. 

 

ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT

FR 606-001:  WICKED WOMEN: TRANSGRESSION AND MISOGYNY IN MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE
INSTRUCTOR:  JULIE HUMAN
MEETING TIMES: M 3:30-6:00

Course will be taught in English; texts are available in the original Old French, and in English or modern French translation. We will study the construction of female characters in 12th- through 14th-century medieval literature as transgressive. We will analyze the boundaries they cross and examine ways in which these female characters resist societal norms, even within the texts that construct them. Texts include the Lais of Marie de France, short poetic texts that focus on love and often magic; selections from Arthurian Lancelot-Grail Cycle featuring the Lady of the Lake, Morgan le Fay, and Guenevere. We will also read about Liénor, who aspires to be empress, and Silence, who becomes a knight and then a king’s wife. Finally, we will meet Mélusine, a fairy who passes as a human woman except on Saturday nights, when she turns into a serpent from the waist down. We will use feminist criticism from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to frame our discussions.

HIS 563-001:  WOMEN AND GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA
INSTRUCTOR:  F.R. CHASSEN-LÓPEZ
MEETING TIMES:  TR 2:00-3:15

This course surveys gender relations in Latin America through a rich diversity of voices and experiences (in academic texts, documentaries, testimonials, literary works, biographies, and film). Using an interdisciplinary focus and intersectional analysis, we explore, for example, Haitian women’s roles in the struggle for independence, gender and tango in Argentina, the art of Frida Kahlo, Chilean mothers protesting dictatorship, unequal access to healthcare for indigenous Peruvians, the situation of LGTQ in the Cuban Revolution, Latina biographies, and the plight of Dominican immigrant families in New York. At the same time, we discuss how machismo has evolved, or not, over time in a region that has already elected ten women presidents.

MAS 590: SPECIAL TOPICS:  GENDER IN POPULAR FILM AND TELEVISION
INSTRUCTOR:  ERIKA ENGSTROM
MEETING TIMES:  TR 9:30-10:45

This course covers hegemony, feminism, egalitarianism, media literacy, woman's film, and stereotypical and progressive gender portrayals​ across television and film. 

ST600:  REPRODUCTIVE POLITICS
INSTRUCTORS:  CAROL MASON (GWS); K. LINDSEY CHAMBERS (PHI); LYDIA PELOT-HOBBS (GEO & AAAS); SHUI-YIN SHARON YAM (WRD)
MEETING TIMES: F 2:00-4:30

This course explores the human-rights based analytical framework of reproductive justice founded by women of color in 1994. This expansive view of reproductive politics prioritizes the knowledge and lived experiences of marginalized subjects, and addresses the way intersectional injustices limit the rights for marginalized people to have children, not have children, and to parent in economically and environmentally sustainable ways. We will integrate or interrogate the ideas that reproduction is a “woman’s issue”; that reproduction is a matter of “developing” populations; that sexual reproduction is a biological necessity; that labor is about workers; or that sexual and social reproduction are related; or that birth justice is a historical reality for all people; that seizing the means of production is more important than the seizing the means of reproduction; and that theological or spiritual understandings of ensoulment and “life itself” are stable. Indeed, to understand that all politics are reproductive politics necessitates learning how philosophical, legal, medical, and social definitions of surrogacy, adoption, wetnursing, husbandry, siring, cloning, pregnancy, abortion, sterilization, parenting, replication, and invitro fertilization are contested over time and across cultures and species.