Spring Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

SPRING 2021 GRADUATE COURSES:  

Download a copy of our graduate course flier for Spring 2021 here.

 

SPRING 2021 Graduate Courses
 

**PLEASE NOTE**
Students must be available during the scheduled course days and times for synchronous class meetings.
If the course is online only and will have synchronous meetings, the instructor will post
a synchronous meeting schedule.
If the course is hybrid, then the instructor will post a schedule of dates the course will meet in person, and dates the course will meet online.

 

GWS 595-002 (same as AAS 400):  ISSUES IN GWS: BLACK FEMINISMS
INSTRUCTOR:  NICOLE MARTIN
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, W 4:00-6:30 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This course investigates the historical context, theoretical tenets, and everyday practice of Black women’s social, political, intellectual, and creative lives. By emphasizing Black feminisms in its plurality, we make critical space for the specificity of Black feminist expression across nationality, sexual orientation, socioeconomics and gendered presentation. Over the course of the semester, we will become familiar with and draw from an array of texts including novels, theatrical productions, scholarly writing, films, music, and poetry. This range of artifacts will allow us to traverse disciplinary boundaries and access multiple entry points for our discussions of Black women’s activism, spirituality, kinship, Diasporic sensibilities, and articulations of futurity. Permission from the instructor is required for enrollment in this course.  Please contact  nicolemartin@uky.edu

GWS 600-001:  ISSUES IN GWS: AMERICAN FICTIONS OF THE 1970’S
INSTRUCTOR: CAROL MASON
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, M 4:00-6:30PM (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This seminar critically examines three right-wing cultural narratives taking influential form in the 1970s whose legacies impact us today: the Invisible Government; the Militant Homosexual; and the Northwest Imperative. We will read primary materials from right-wing movements contextualized with secondary sources by scholars to understand the bases for current conspiratorial fictions known as “deep state,” “gender ideology,” and the “great replacement.” In this way we will be poised to analyze comparatively the concept of “America” as it manifested in 1970s politics and popular culture of the United States and as it currently transcends national boundaries in the midst of a global rise of the right. Tertiary sources will therefore include cultural and feminist studies of the 1970s as well as American Studies guides to interdisciplinary analysis.

GWS 640-001:  HISTORY OF FEMINIST THOUGHT:  BORDERS, ACTIVISM, RESISTANCE
INSTRUCTOR: KAREN TICE    
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, T 4:00-6:30  (The instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This seminar explores the historiography of feminist thought/activism focusing on transnational and intersectional feminisms, coalitions-building, and borders/exclusions across time and place.  It is intended to give a series of snapshots of the connections and contestations as well as the overlaps and divergences that have characterized feminist mobilizations and theorizations of power, solidarity, intersectionality, transnational/indigenous/Black feminisms, imperialism, colonialism, coalitions, nationalism, and resistance that have characterized feminist trajectories and debates. The course is meant to complicate linear Westernized feminist “wave” narratives by its focus on understudied decades and groups as well as to deepen understandings of how race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, capitalism, geo-political and personal borders, affect, embodiment, cultural context, repression/backlash, and place have shaped feminist thought/activism.  This course is required for GWS PhD students and may count toward requirements for the graduate certificate.

 

ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT


EPE 667: GENDER AND EDUCATION
INSTRUCTOR: KAREN TICE
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, W 4:00-6:30 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

Using a variety of interdisciplinary theories, this seminar considers the ways that gender and intersectional differences are enacted and resisted in formal and informal educational institutions and spaces across time. Using analytic frames such as intersectionality and affect theory, this course will explore how emergent socio-political processes such as neoliberalism have shaped discourses, practices/policies, and the production of difference, margins, diversity, equity, and social justice in education.  This course will also consider recent effects of the pandemic on gender politics and disparities in education.

PHI 715:  HANNAH ARENDT, COVID-19, AND THINKING IN DARK TIMES
INSTRUCTOR:  NATALIE NENADIC
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE, R 4:30-7:00 (Instructor will announce synchronous meeting dates)

This course centers on close readings of Hannah Arendt’s major works The Origins of Totalitarianism and Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil as well as key essays. Her thought analyzes major political crises of our era focused on authoritarian government -- from totalitarian systems (Nazism and communism) to other types of dictatorship. We will cover her treatment of such topics as: how societies slip into authoritarianism; concurrent shifts in societal and moral norms; systemic inequality, racism, and anti-Semitism; questions of law, criminality, evil, and legal accountability; and ethics and personal responsibility. Arendt evinces the idea that philosophy or thinking is most needed in times of crisis to help us understand and navigate them and that it emanates from a multidisciplinary proximity to these developments and through knowledge of the past that resonates with them. In this way, we will consider how her thought may help us make sense of today’s extraordinary times. We will center on the unique experience of COVID-19 in the United States and will include topics such as its disproportionate health and economic effects on communities of color, Native American nations, and women and its intersections with Black Lives Matter. 

PSY 563-001:  DIVERSITY AMONG CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FAMILIES
INSTRUCTOR:  RACHEL FARR
MEETING TIMES:  HYBRID, TR 9:30-10:45AM (This course will meet in person and online)

The notion of the “traditional American family” has transformed as families in the United States have become increasingly more diverse. This course is intended to provide senior psychology majors (others may enroll with instructor’s permission) with an overview and analysis of a variety of contemporary family systems in the U.S., such as single-parent families, adoptive and foster family systems, families who have children via reproductive technologies, and families with sexual and gender minority parents. Taught from a developmental psychological perspective, students will also gain understanding in family systems theory and in research methods for studying family systems. Course material will be considered within the context of social issues, questions, and public controversies, e.g., “Is the traditional family disappearing?”, “Is the institution of marriage dying or changing?”, “Do children need both a mother and a father for optimal development?”. The course will address factors that contribute to positive family functioning and healthy outcomes for children and parents. Implications for future research, clinical practice, public policy, and law surrounding parenting and families (e.g., custody and placement decisions) will be covered. Course goals are accomplished through interactive dialogue of course readings, multiple opportunities for presentation on course topics, and several course projects/papers. This course will provide helpful foundation for any students thinking about continuing into developmental psychology, clinical or counseling psychology, family science, social work, education or medical professions, or other related fields.

ST 600: QUEER THEORY
INSTRUCTORS:  ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, CHARLIE ZHANG, RUSTY BARRETT, JACK GIESEKING
MEETING TIMES:  HYBRID, F 2:00-4:30PM  (This course will meet in person and online)

The field of Queer Theory emerged in the early 1990s and is devoted to examining how concepts like “queerness,” deviance, and normativity informed larger systems of power. However, Queer Theory has sometimes (rightfully) been accused of centering whiteness and ignoring the ways in which differing positionalities of race, class, ability, region, religion, etc., mediate the extent to which queerness proves an emancipatory or positive framework. This seminar seeks to disrupt the largely white and US-centric focus of mainstream Queer Theory. Instead, we will ask what Queer Theory has to offer to marginalized populations. The faculty offer expertise in various time periods and geographic spaces (including East Asia, Africa, and Latin America) and the syllabus will prioritize works focused on both people living in the Global South and marginalized groups in the Global North.

SPA 681: MAGICAL REALISM MEETS WEIRD MATERIALISMS:  LATIN/X AMERICAN WOMEN FICTION WRITERS THEORIZE THE HORRORS OF THE 21ST CENTURY
INSTRUCTOR:  DIERDRA REBER
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE, W 4:30-7:00PM

“Ghost stor[ies] for the real world,” “psychological realism, science fiction, comedy and horror, fantasy and fabulism” whose narrative modalities include “psychological menace,” “black magic,” “physical and metaphysical blindness,” and “dangerous games that blur the line between love and violence,” are some of the descriptors of Latin American women’s fiction published in the last ten years.  Primarily short story anthologies and novels, this literary corpus of predominantly 30s- and 40s-something writers from the Southern Cone, the Andes, the Caribbean, Mexico, and the United States is populated with “broken souls,” “toxins,” “drugs,” “pain,” “disappearance,” “psychopathic cannibal[s],” “Catholics-turned-terrorists,” “17th-century buccaneers,” “African-derived religious practices,” “Siamese fighting fish, cockroaches, cats, snakes, [and] strange fungus” in apartment buildings and libraries, on road trips and space travel, at the Mexico-US border and in the Antilles, across time in the past, present, and future.  One author is likened to a “psychoanalyst in a planetary refugee camp.”  We will explore this fiction alongside feminist theoretical texts from both hemispheres in the Americas, but we will fundamentally consider how these works enunciate their own theory about current cultural realities from a literary platform.  Using a kaleidoscopic mix of genres, these authors play with horror, magic, and the weird to render fierce social criticism from their narrative exposition of material realties about relationships, affect, power, and the prospects for self-determination and decolonization of the feminist subject.  Course materials will be available in both Spanish and English; class discussion will be conducted Spanish or English as determined by enrollment. Exercises will include short weekly position papers, student teaching, and a final essay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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