Fall Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester visit the online University Course Catalog. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. There may also be GWS courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

Fall 2021 GWS Course Descriptions
 

GWS 200-001:  SEX & POWER    
INSTRUCTOR:  JENN HUNT 
MWF 10:00-10:50AM

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of both Gender Studies and Women's Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women’s studies, feminist studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological. Students will use gender-based theory to look at the ways in which gender identification and representation influences individuals and societies. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 200-201: SEX & POWER   
INSTRUCTOR: TBD

MWF 11:00-11:50AM (online synchronous)
Introduces Gender and Women’s Studies from a social science perspective using cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approaches. Analyzes relations of power marked by gender and how these relate to other social distinctions and processes. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 200-202: SEX AND POWER
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
Online, asynchronous

Introduces Gender and Women’s Studies from a social science perspective using cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approaches. Analyzes relations of power marked by gender and how these relate to other social distinctions and processes. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-001: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
TR 9:30-10:45AM    
      

This course examines the role of popular culture in the construction of gendered identities in contemporary society. We examine a wide range of popular cultural forms -- including music, computer games, movies, and television -- to illustrate how femininity and masculinity are produced, represented, and consumed.  This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-201:  GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
Online, asynchronous

Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender and Women's Studies, examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women, and explores the lives, achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-202:  GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR:  ARIA HALLIDAY
TR 11:00-12:15PM (online, synchronous)

This course examines the role of popular culture in the construction of gendered identities in contemporary society. We examine a wide range of popular cultural forms -- including music, computer games, movies, and television -- to illustrate how femininity and masculinity are produced, represented, and consumed. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-203:  GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
Online, Asynchronous

This course examines the role of popular culture in the construction of gendered identities in contemporary society. We examine a wide range of popular cultural forms -- including music, computer games, movies, and television -- to illustrate how femininity and masculinity are produced, represented, and consumed.  This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-204:  GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
Online, Asynchronous 
Part of Term Course:  Oct 18-Dec 17

This course examines the role of popular culture in the construction of gendered identities in contemporary society. We examine a wide range of popular cultural forms -- including music, computer games, movies, and television -- to illustrate how femininity and masculinity are produced, represented, and consumed.  This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 250-001:  SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
SECTIONS:
001:  MWF 11:00-11:50AM
201:  MW 2:00-2:50PM & F TBD (online synchronous)

This course takes you through some ways in which people have organized themselves around local, national, and international issues pertaining to gender. We engage key theories that explain the origins, strategies, and success of different forms of social movements across the world. We also critically analyze case studies from different parts of the world to understand how social movements work on the ground and in specific cultural environments with unique historical trajectories, attending to ways in which social movements are shaped by, and do or do not result in changes to social structures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality.  This course is a required core course for the undergraduate GWS major and minor.

GWS 301-001 (same as AAS 400-003):  CROSSROADS: BLACK FEMINISMS ON DISPLAY
INSTRUCTOR: ARIA HALLIDAY  
TR 2:00-3:15PM

This course, “Blacks Feminisms on Display,” exposes students to Black feminist theory, activism, and art. As investigators and collaborators, students will explore genealogies of Black feminism(s) and womanism via canonical and contemporary work written by and about Black women. Students also examine theories of the body and the ways that Black women’s bodies have been used in organizing and visual arts since the 19th century. Exposed to Black feminisms in theory and culture, students will conclude the semester with digital “music videos” where they analyze a contemporary cultural production, using Black feminist concepts, and histories of Black women in the US and Anglophone Caribbean.  This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Community, Culture and U.S. Citizenship.

GWS 301-002:  CROSSROADS: MIGRATION STORIES
INSTRUCTOR: CAROL MASON 
TR 2:00-3:15PM

This course is designed to examine the roles that migration and immigration of people have played in the development of cultural diversity in the United States. What factors influence people’s decisions to migrate within the US or immigrate to the US? How do we distinguish the myths and opinions from facts about the US immigration system? What are human rights, and how do they relate to refugees and asylum seekers? What are the lived experiences of such immigrants? In addition to these historical and sociological questions, we will engage personal stories of immigrants through archived videos and graphic novels. Students will have the opportunity to create their own story about immigration or migration. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Community, Culture and U.S. Citizenship.

GWS 302-001 (Same as AAS 400-004): GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: GENDER IN SOUTHERN AFRICA
INSTRUCTOR:  FRANCES HENDERSON
MWF 1:00-1:50PM

Interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational examination of issues of gender focused on themes in Southern Africa. Thematic focus explicating gender which also illuminates questions of history and political economy in Southern African countries including Zimbabwe and South Africa among others. Introduces students to research and a variety of analytical questions in the field, as well as the interaction between locales/people and structural processes.  This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics.  This course has been cancelled for the Fall 2021 semester.  

GWS 302-002:  GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES IN GWS
INSTRUCTOR:  KAREN TICE
TR 3:30-4:45PM

Interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational examination of issues of gender focused around particular themes and locations. Thematic focus explicating gender which also illuminates questions of history and political economy in specific locations. Introduces students to research and a variety of analytical questions in the field, as well as the interaction between locales/people and structural processes. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics.  This course has been cancelled for the Fall 2021 semester. 

GWS 302-003:  GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD:  GLOBAL GAYS IN THE GLOBAL GAZE
INSTRUCTOR:  ELIZABETH WILLIAMS
MWF 12:00-12:50

This course takes an interdisciplinary and transnational approach to the study of GLBTQ lives, histories, and identities. We will consider how same-sex attraction and love have been understood in dramatically different ways across time and place. Likewise, gender has not always been understood in terms of binary between male and female, masculine and feminine; rather, a wide range of gender(ed) identities have been deemed possible and acceptable in various times and places. Students in this course will likely be familiar with the current discourse of GLBTQ rights, a discourse that has, in the past decade, focused particularly on gay marriage. We will explore how this politics emerged in Europe and America, and ask to what extent this framework is applicable or useful in the Global South.  Students in this course will: (1) Understand how “queer” is used as a theoretical position and political standpoint, (2) Understand how ideas about sex, gender, and sexuality have changed over time and across geographic space, (3) Learn how to read academic texts strategically, looking for argument, evidence, and approach. (4) Hone skills in academic writing, with a focus on argumentation, organization, and analysis. (5) Develop proficiency in analyzing popular media, unpacking the deeper meanings at play. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics.

GWS 340-001:  HISTORY OF FEMINIST THOUGHT TO 1975
INSTRUCTOR: KAREN TICE
TR 12:30-1:45PM

This course is designed to provide students with an historical overview of the cultural diversity, creative and theoretical expression, and defining moments in the development of feminist thought up to 1975. Texts will include works, such as that of Hypatia, Christine De Pizan, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, and Mary Astell, that pre-date the term “feminist” but that are pioneering statements in the struggle for gender equality. “Thought” will include political manifestos, poetry, and short stories, as well as classic works of feminist theory and cultural criticism. This course is required for GWS majors and minors.  This course has been cancelled for the Fall 2021 semester. 

GWS 350-001:  FEMINIST THEORY
INSTRUCTOR:  CAROL MASON
TR 11:00-12:15PM

An interdisciplinary course that acquaints undergraduate students with the central issues and texts in contemporary feminist theories. It will examine what feminist and womanist theories are and the ways in which they analyze and explain the workings of our social world. The course will clarify basic concepts in feminist thought such as gender, difference, patriarchy, and post-colonialism and will provide students with tools to analyze these theories and explore contemporary applications.  This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 400-001:  DOING FEMINIST RESEARCH    
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD
MW 3:00-4:15PM

In this course, students will learn how to conduct research from a feminist perspective. Because Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary field, scholars utilize different approaches to gathering and analyzing data. In this course, students become researchers. Throughout the semester, we will try out different approaches—from interviewing people to “reading” films—and discuss what makes feminist research feminist. We will discuss why researchers decide on certain approaches over others, why certain topics can be difficult to approach, and how feminist ethics plays a role in constructing and actualizing a research project. The course culminates in a final project where students choose their own research topic, write research questions, conduct their own research project, and share their process with their peers. This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 506-001:  HISTORY OF SEXUALITY IN THE U.S.      
INSTRUCTOR:  MELISSA STEIN   
TR 12:30-1:45PM (online, synchronous)

Covering a broad chronological scope, from the colonial period to the present, this course is designed to introduce students to the major themes, debates, and developments in the history of sexuality in the United States. Given this large scope, the course will not be exhaustive, but rather offer a representative sample of key moments and issues in the history of sexuality. Particular attention will be paid to the roles that gender, race, culture, and class play in shaping ideas about and experiences of sex and sexuality. In recent years, scholars have come to understand sexual expression and sexual categories not as static, objective, or natural realities, but as social constructions. Thus, during the course, we will continually interrogate the term “sexuality,” and the changing meanings and expectations associated with the category across various cultural and historical contexts. In addition, this course will explore several themes throughout the semester, including: Reproduction and reproductive control; Regulation of gender, sex, and bodies; Laws and cultural norms regarding sex, marriage, and cross-cultural encounters; Changing ideas about sexuality in science and popular culture; Violence and power; and Sexual variation, identity, and identity politics. This course fulfills requirements for the Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate major and minor, and the Sexuality Studies certificate.

GWS 595-001:  ISSUES IN GWS:  GENDER, SEXUALITY, & SPIRITUALITY
INSTRUCTOR:  TARA TUTTLE
TR 3:30-4:45PM

Despite the role of religion in the perpetuation of gender-, sexuality-, and race- based oppressions, many feminist, queer, and trans activists’ spiritualities informed their work for gender, sexual, and racial justice. This course examines historic and contemporary religious and spiritual egalitarian efforts to resist binary and hierarchical understandings, beliefs, and practices of gender and sexuality that continue to be deployed to justify discrimination and oppression. We will discuss the legacies of hierarchical, complementarian theological claims and explore feminist, womanist, queer, and trans theological works on gender, sexuality, hermeneutics, and spirituality. The course will investigate these concepts considering a variety of faith traditions while using an intersectional lens of analysis.

 

ADDITIONAL GWS RELATED COURSES

HIS 349:  GENDER AND WAR IN THE MODERN ERA:
FROM THE FRENCH REVOLUTION TO THE INVASION OF IRAQ
INSTRUCTOR:  F. CHASSEN-LOPEZ

T 5:00-7:30PM
Despite the fact that throughout history, war has been considered a masculine activity, women, their labor and their bodies, have also been central to war making. Using testimonies, interviews, documentaries, and other primary sources in addition to scholarly studies and film, this course will analyze women’s and men’s roles and experiences in war, and how these roles have changed over time. We begin with the French Revolution and continue through the Civil War in the U.S., both World Wars, various revolutions (for example, Mexico and China), genocide, and conclude with the Invasion of Iraq. The course will include interactive exercises that will encourage students to have a more personal understanding of the meaning of war.  

HON 251:  FEMINIST DIS/ABILITY STUDIES
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD
MWF 1:00-1:50

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the study of dis/ability from a feminist perspective. In both academic and popular discourse, disability has most often been regarded as a pathology to be cured or a tragedy to be pitied. This course challenges those framings of disability through probing the cultural, political, and social meanings that we attribute to human variation and proposes that disability is an effect of power relations. Informed by the notion that disability is socially constructed, materially experienced, profoundly political, raced, gendered, and classed, this course explores how ableism has deemed certain bodyminds “less than,” “unruly,” “mad,” and/or “disposable.” The goal of this course is to reimagine disability, and to that end it foregrounds the cultural and political work that disabled people, themselves, have engaged in over the course of the 21st century.

LIN 317: LANGUAGE IN SOCIETY:  LANGUAGE, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY
INSTRUCTOR:  RUSTY BARRETT
TR 9:30-10:45AM

This course presents an overview of current research on language, gender and sexuality. We will first examine cross-linguistic variation in categories related to gender and sexuality and linguistic variation in representations of gender and sexual differences. We will then examine gendered variation within specific languages and gendered patterns of conversational interaction. The course will also look at language use in LGBTQ+ communities and language issues in transgender communities around the world. The course will then turn to the role of language in sexual markets, perceptions of the body, and in violence against women.
 

 


 

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