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Fall Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester visit the online University Course Catalog. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. There may also be GWS courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.

FALL 2022 COURSES

 

GWS 200-001:  SEX & POWER
INSTRUCTOR:  SHAWNA FELKINS

MEETING TIMES: MWF 10:00-10:50
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary fields of both Gender Studies and Women's Studies which explore the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political arenas. It draws upon scholarship in women’s studies, feminist studies, masculinities studies, and queer studies which themselves draw upon a variety of intellectual perspectives, including historical, psychological, rhetorical, sociological, literary, and biological. Students will use gender-based theory to look at the ways in which gender identification and representation influences individuals and societies. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 200-201: SEX & POWER
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
MEETING TIMES: ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS

This course introduces Gender and Women’s Studies from a social science perspective using cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approaches. Analyzes relations of power marked by gender and how these relate to other social distinctions and processes. Interactive learning format. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Social Science) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE            
SECTIONS:

001:  MWF 9:00-9:50, TBD
002:  TR 9:30-10:45, TBD
201:  ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS, FRANCES HENDERSON
203:  ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS, TBD

204:  ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS, PART OF TERM: OCT 17-DEC 9, SHAWNA FELKINS

This course examines the role of popular culture in the construction of gendered identities in contemporary society. We examine a wide range of popular cultural forms – including music, computer games, movies, and television – to illustrate how femininity and masculinity are produced, represented, and consumed. This course serves as an introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) from a humanities perspective. We will explore the ways identities are constructed through various types of media and popular culture. Representations of gender are central to our study but are always already influenced by other social categories, such as race, sexuality, and class. As a class, in addition to scholarly work, we will investigate how different kinds of texts, such as music videos, movies, television, advertisements, social media, and fictional work, shape our understanding and experience regarding what it means to be a “man” or a “woman.” Throughout this exploration, we will also consider how representation affects us as individuals and as communities in ways to reproduce and perpetuate the social hierarchy of gender, race, sexuality, and class. In GWS 201, we will explore a variety of texts through different lenses that recognize the social systems that privilege some and disadvantage others based on claimed and perceived identities. This course will give you an opportunity to develop your communication and research skills, but most of all, it will challenge you as a critical thinker. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirement (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 201-202: GENDER & POPULAR CULTURE
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
MEETING TIMES: 
TR 11:00-12:15, ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

This course examines the role of popular culture in the construction of gendered identities in contemporary society. We examine a wide range of popular cultural forms -- including music, computer games, movies, and television -- to illustrate how femininity and masculinity are produced, represented, and consumed. This course meets USP and/or UK Core requirements (Intellectual Inquiry, Humanities) and counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors.

GWS 250-001: SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
MEETING TIMES:  MWF 11:00-11:50

This course takes you through some ways in which people have organized themselves around local, national, and international issues pertaining to gender. We engage key theories that explain the origins, strategies, and success of different forms of social movements across the world. We also critically analyze case studies from different parts of the world to understand how social movements work on the ground and in specific cultural environments with unique historical trajectories, attending to ways in which social movements are shaped by, and do or do not result in changes to social structures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. This course is required for undergraduate GWS majors and minors. Applies to UK Core requirement: Global Dynamics

GWS 300-001 (SAME AS PSY 375-003): TOPICS IN GWS: PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
INSTRUCTOR:  JENN HUNT
MEETING TIMES:  TR 11:00-12:15

This course examines psychological research and theory related to gender, with a focus on the ways in which gender impacts people’s daily lives.  We will begin by discussing femininity, masculinity, and other gender identities, the problems of assuming a gender/sex binary, and how gender intersects with other social identities.  Then, we will investigate the origins of gender by considering social, cognitive, and biological influences on gender development.  Next, we will learn about gender stereotypes and how they compare with actual similarities and differences between women and men.  In the second half of the class, we will use this knowledge to assess how gender affects several important life domains including work, violence, relationships, sexuality, and body image.  Throughout the course, we will examine how gender can be studied using feminist empirical research methods and emphasize the importance of race, ethnicity, culture, social class, and sexual orientation in understanding gender. This course counts toward both the Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) and Psychology (PSY) majors.  The prerequisite for the course is GWS 200 or GWS 201 (GWS prefix) or PSY 100 (PSY prefix).   

GWS 301-001 (SAME AS AAS 400-001):  CROSSROADS IN GWS:  BLACK & LATINA WOMEN IN U.S. POLITICS
INSTRUCTOR:  FRANCES HENDERSON
MEETING TIMES: MWF 12:00-12:50

This course examines Black and Latina women’s participation in American politics as citizens, voters, activists, and elites. Central to this course are the meaning and nature of gender equality and the ways that gender intersects with race, ethnicity and class. Throughout the course, we will interrogate ideas about citizenship and participation through the lens of Black and Latina women. Politics will be broadly conceived to account for the various ways in which women of color participate both inside and on the margins of formal politics and political processes in the US. Thus, topics will likely include: analysis of the mobilization of women of color around reproductive justice, the carceral state, immigration and education, in addition to Black and Latina women’s mobilization into politics through the suffrage movement and the modern women’s movement. The course will also analyze the role of gender and race in shaping public opinion and electoral behavior; public opinion and electoral behavior on gender issues; women’s activities within the political parties. Throughout the semester, we will be following the role of Black and Latina women and gender issues in the 2020 election. This course will provide students with a limited introduction to the study of gender and U.S. politics including some central questions, concepts, and debates in the field. Students will develop intersectional theoretical frameworks and analytical tools for studying gender and politics in the United States.  This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Community, Culture and U.S. Citizenship.

GWS 301-002:  CROSSROADS IN GWS:  QUEER LITERATURE
INSTRUCTOR:  CAROL MASON
MEETING TIMES: TR 11:00-12:15

This course aims to educate you about the diversity of US citizens. Our iteration of this course focuses on providing you with key analytical concepts as manifest in queer literature, focusing on novels and memoir. We use the term “queer” in this class as a word derived from a social movement aimed at promoting equal rights for lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transgender people – also known as the GLBTQ community. Regardless of your own relation to this community, this class allows you to explore your own sense of what being “American” means. The idea of border-crossing and migration among geographic, sexual, national, racial, and gendered boundaries reverberates throughout the readings. The readings were chosen because most are Lambda Literary Award winners, meaning that they are highly regarded works of literary fiction, poetry, and memoir. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minor and fulfills the UK Core requirements for U.S. Citizenship.

GWS 301-201:  CROSSROADS IN GWS:  GENDER IN THE US SOUTH
INSTRUCTOR:  SHAWNA FELKINS
MEETING TIMES:  ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS, PART OF TERM:  AUG 22-OCT 14

This course provides an examination of gender in the U.S. South through selected memoirs, films, documentaries, and journal articles. From Appalachia to the Mississippi and the Bluegrass to the Gulf Coast, we will explore these and other questions: how does place change our experiences and expectations of gender? What do stories of the South offer us when thinking about “traditional” gender roles and new imaginings and possible futures for life outside of the binary? Using an intersectional focus, we will read and analyze a variety of literary works and academic texts written by those who identify as “Southerners” that explore themes and experiences of gender, race, sexuality, class, and place.  This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors, and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Community, Culture, and U.S. Citizenship.  


GWS 302-001:  GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: TRANSNATIONAL BODY
INSTRUCTOR:  ANASTASIA TODD
MEETING TIMES: TR 12:30-1:45

Engaging with a transnational feminist lens, students in this interdisciplinary course will explore how gender, race, class, ability, nationality, and sexuality intersect and inform how the body is produced—materially, affectively, and discursively—under contemporary globalizing forces. Focusing in on how neoliberal capitalism is an organizing force across borders, this course aims to uncover how systems of power structure the lived realities of women, Black people, indigenous people, people of color, queer people, and disabled people. We investigate the figuration of the global south girl, the female entrepreneur, the global care citizen, the hyper-precarious worker, and the cyborg soldier in order to explore key theoretical concepts such as militarization, body labor, disability, and reproductive justice. This course counts toward requirements for GWS majors and minors, and fulfills the UK Core requirements for Global Dynamics.
 
GWS 302-002: GENDER ACROSS THE WORLD: MASCULINITIES
INSTRUCTOR:  CHARLIE ZHANG
MEETING TIMES: TR 2:00-3:15

This course is designed to provide a thorough and wide-ranging introduction to the field of masculinities studies. We will engage the fundamental concepts underpinning critical inquiry of masculinities, address various theoretical issues through disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches, and analyze variant forms of masculinities from historical, philosophical, socioeconomic, transnational, cultural, and sociological perspectives. Students will examine the articulations and contestations of diverse masculinities as manifested through gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, kinship, politics, popular culture, economics, national identity, post/colonialism, and violence. Readings reflect multiple methods of scholarly analysis to understand, define, and trouble masculinities, and compel students to consider what is at stake in making sense of masculinities. You will also have opportunities to apply this knowledge to a variety of sociocultural sites in the transnational context. This course counts toward requirements for undergraduate GWS majors and minors, and fulfills the UK Core requirement (Global Dynamics).

GWS 350-001: INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST THEORY
INSTRUCTOR:  CAROL MASON
MEETING TIMES: TR 2:00-3:15

An interdisciplinary course that acquaints undergraduate students with the central issues and texts in contemporary feminist theories. It will examine what feminist and womanist theories are and the ways in which they analyze and explain the workings of our social world. The course will clarify basic concepts in feminist thought such as gender, difference, patriarchy, and post-colonialism and will provide students with tools to analyze these theories and explore contemporary applications.  This course is required for GWS majors and minors.

GWS 400-001:  DOING FEMINIST RESEARCH
INSTRUCTOR:  CHARLIE ZHANG
MEETING TIMES:  TR 3:30-4:45

This course provides an interdisciplinary perspective for undergraduate students to examine a variety of epistemological concerns and methodological issues in feminist scholarship. It is designed to expand the students’ knowledge of feminist epistemologies and methodologies in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. We will read about, discuss, and practice a variety of research methods, particularly qualitative methods, and develop critical thinking about the central debates in the field of gender and women’s studies. Through multiple research exercises, students will gain basic skills, practice commonly used methods, and experiment with different ways of approaching topics to develop their own research interests and plans for the future. This course is required for undergraduate GWS majors, and counts toward requirements for GWS minors. Please note that course enrollment is  restricted to GWS majors, minor, or permission of the instructor.

GWS 430-001:  GENDER, POWER, AND VIOLENCE
INSTRUCTOR:  SRIMATI BASU
MEETING TIMES:  MW 3:00-4:15

This course examines the relations between the three terms gender, power and violence. The course is interdisciplinary and transnational in its scope, and examines scales of violence from intimate to community to State, bodily to psychological, economic to cultural. We will read some conceptual pieces on gender and power, look at a number of films and shows, and read a number of studies of  gender-based violence drawing on a variety of disciplines. You will also work on an independent project where you apply these theories and studies to your scholarly or field research.  Note: much the focus of the course is on assault and domestic violence, so you are advised to evaluate your own ability to discuss and analyze these issues – it is an elective class, so no texts are exempt.

 

ADDITIONAL COURSE FOR GWS CREDIT
 

ANT 401:  GENDER ROLES IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE
INSTRUCTOR:  MONICA UDVARDY
MEETING TIMES:  TR 4:00-5:15, MODALITY TBD
(Please see the course catalog for updated meeting information)

The world encompasses a liberating array of cross-cultural variation in how humans interpret sexual difference. ANT 401 explores this diversity and examines how it is socially and culturally constructed. A range of gender roles and identities at all levels of social organizational complexity are surveyed and examined through the lens of how conceptions of gender affect, and are affected by kinship and social organization, the political economy, as well as belief systems and worldview. Additional topics include the history of the study of gender within anthropology and the impact of development on gender systems in the global South. A primary objective is for the student to reflect upon her/his own gendered self. This course counts toward electives for the Gender and Women’s Studies major/minor, Certificate in Sexuality Studies, the Anthropology major or minor, and/or toward certain themes in the International Studies major.

MAS 590-001:  GENDER PORTRAYALS IN MEDIA
INSTRUCTOR:  ERIKA ENGSTROM
MEETING TIMES: TR 11:00-12:15

This course covers hegemony, feminism, egalitarianism, media literacy, woman's film, and stereotypical and progressive gender portrayals​ across television and film. Among the media texts to be examined are NBC's Parks and Recreation, the CW's Supernatural, and the 2015 film Mad Max: Fury Road. Students will analyze a media text of their choosing that illustrates concepts and theories related to gender representation.             

SOC 350:  THE SOCIOLOGY OF THE BODY AND EMBODIMENT
INSTRUCTOR:  ROBYN BROWN

MEETING TIMES:  TR 11:00-12:15
Bodies are socially constructed in ways that privilege some over others.  In this course, we will examine how bodies are gendered, raced, classed, and sexualized in ways that affect embodied experience and life chances.  We will also consider how meanings associated with disability and weight make some bodies more economically and culturally valuable than others.  In recognizing the body as a site where social forces and ideologies intrude on our lives, however, we can also appreciate it as a means through which to challenge power and status hierarchies. Thus, this course will further an understanding of the body as contested terrain that is central to an understanding of social and political reform.

SOC 350- 002:   SEXUALITIES
INSTRUCTOR:  ALESSANDRA DEL BROCCO    

MEETING TIMES:  TR 2:00-3:15
This course will examine how sexuality intersects with aspects of social life, including race,  class, and gender as well as political and economic trends over time. By taking a sociological approach, we will incorporate theories of inequality and intersectionality to examine different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying sexuality in the United States.

SOC 334- 001:   SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILIES  
INSTRUCTOR: MOHAMMAD ZANNOUN

MEETING TIMES: MWF 12-12:50pm
This course is a sociological examination of the theories, concepts, issues, and research findings on families and dynamics of family life with an emphasis on social context and the diversity of families.

SOC 433- 001: MASCULINITIES
INSTRUCTOR: EDWARD MORRIS

MEETING TIMES:   TR 9:30-10:45am   
This course examines how gender shapes the personal lives of those defined as men and women; how gender operates as a system of inequality that confers general benefits on men and differs through intersections of race, class, and sexuality; and how masculine power confers hidden costs for men.