Fall Courses

 

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. There may also be GWS courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.
 
GWS Graduate Course Descriptions for Fall 2019:

You can print out a copy of the course flier here
 

GWS 600-001:  TOPICS IN GWS: FEMINIST AFFECT THEORY
ANASTASIA TODD     W 2:00-4:30

This graduate-level seminar explores the affective turn in the humanities and social sciences. There is no one definition of affect, but this course takes feminist and queer approaches to affect as its point of departure. We will consider how affect—as the intersubjective glue that creates, holds, and transverses relations between bodies—intersects with race, disability, gender, and sexuality. From Lauren Berlant’s theorization of “public feelings,” to Sara Ahmed’s concept of “stickiness,” to Jin Haritaworn’s mobilization of “queer regeneration,” we will trace how feminist and queer theorists have taken up affect and affectivity. We will also explore the critical debates around affective labor (both online and off), affective capitalism (in the age of Trump), and the intersection of biopolitics, necropolitics, and affect. Ephemeral, ordinary, mobile…affect is difficult to capture. We will ultimately ask ourselves: How can an engagement with affect enrich our understanding of contemporary systems of power? How can an engagement with affect help us transform our world? How can we harness the methodological and epistemological richness of affect in our own work?  And, what is a “well-dressed love machine”?

GWS 640-001:  HISTORY OF FEMINIST THOUGHT:  ACTIVISM
KAREN TICE                     T 4:00-6:30

This seminar surveys the historiography of feminist thought/activism focusing on the production of transnational and intersectional feminisms, coalitions, and exclusions across time and place.  It is intended to give a series of snapshots of the connections and contestations as well as the overlaps and divergences that have characterized feminist mobilizations and theorizing.  The course is meant to complicate linear feminist “wave” narratives by its focus on activism in understudied decades as well as to deepen understandings of how race/ethnicity, gender, class, imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, geo-political and personal borders, intersectionality, emotion, embodiment, cultural context, repression/backlash, and place have shaped feminist thought/activism.

GWS 700-001:  TOPICAL SEMINAR IN GWS:  LOVE
SRIMATI BASU                M 4:30-7:00

This course is an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural exploration of ways of thinking about “love.” It purposely turns away from the romantic couple as the primary focus of love discourses and  looks to various registers through which we  talk about forms of love, including language, kinship, and political economy.   We explore the valences of topics such as intimacy and affect; sexual economies and love; love and media; labor and money. We will be working through a number of theoretical texts (in literary studies, anthropology, media studies, history. queer theory) as well as fiction, film and popular media in order to map the terrain.

ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT

A&S 600: PERSPECTIVES ON DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
CRISTINA ALCALDE         PART OF TERM: AUG 26-OCT 18

This 8-week course introduces students to meanings, practices, and theories connected to diversity and inclusion, and the implications of these within an increasingly interconnected world. The course approaches diversity and inclusion as central to professional and societal well- being and success. Students will critically examine the ways in which power, privilege, oppression, diversity, and inclusion inform everyday lives, organizations, institutions, and societies. Students will engage with multiple perspectives on human differences through multidisciplinary lenses to increase their awareness and understanding of the varied ways in which social identities and cultural beliefs inform social and professional settings on an individual basis and systemically.

EPE 667:  EDUCATION AND GENDER
BETH GOLDSTEIN      W 7:00-9:30
This course focuses on the formations, enactments, and performances of gender within a diversity of education settings. Using a variety of source materials and different theoretical lenses, we will address such questions as:  How and what do educational institutions teach about gender?  How do students, teachers and communities create and respond to these learning contexts?  In what ways does the intersectionality of social class, race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, culture, and place shape the engendering of our educational lives? How do education activism and education policy contribute to how societies address gender equity and social difference?

FR 606-001:  WICKED WOMEN: TRANSGRESSION AND MISOGYNY IN MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE
JULIE HUMAN             R 3:30-6:00

In this course we will study the construction of female characters in 13th- and 14th-century medieval romance as transgressive. We will analyze the boundaries they cross and examine ways in which these female characters resist societal norms, even within the texts that construct them. Course will be taught in English; texts are available in the original Old French, and in English or modern French translation. Texts include selections from Arthurian romances featuring the Lady of the Lake, Morgan le Fay, and Guenevere. We will also read about Liénor, who aspires to be empress, and Silence, who becomes a knight and then a king’s wife. Finally, we will meet Mélusine, a fairy who passes as a woman except on Saturday nights, when she turns into a serpent from the waist down. We will use feminist criticism from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to frame our discussions.

HIS 595/355H:  WOMEN, GENDER AND WAR
INSTRUCTOR:  F. CHASSEN-LOPEZ   T 5:00-7:30

Despite the fact that throughout history, war has been considered a masculine activity, women, their labor and their bodies, have always been central to war making. This course will examine women’s roles in wartime, beginning with the French Revolution and ending with the 21st century. Using testimonies, interviews, and other primary sources in addition to scholarly studies, documentaries, and film, we will focus on three main issues: 1) What has been the concrete impact of war on women, men, and families, gender roles and gender relations over time and in distinct cultures? 2) What has been the role of gendered metaphors and symbols as weapons in the war of words? and 3) How have wars also played out as physical and ideological battles over women’s bodies? The course will include various interactive exercises that will encourage the students to have a more personal understanding of the topics at hand.
 

 

 

X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading