Fall Courses

 

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. There may also be GWS courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.
 
GWS Graduate Course Descriptions for Fall 2021:

 
GWS 595-001:  ISSUES IN GWS:  GENDER, SEXUALITY, & SPIRITUALITY
INSTRUCTOR:  TARA TUTTLE

TR 3:30-4:45PM
Despite the role of religion in the perpetuation of gender-, sexuality-, and race- based oppressions, many feminist, queer, and trans activists’ spiritualities informed their work for gender, sexual, and racial justice. This course examines historic and contemporary religious and spiritual egalitarian efforts to resist binary and hierarchical understandings, beliefs, and practices of gender and sexuality that continue to be deployed to justify discrimination and oppression. We will discuss the legacies of hierarchical, complementarian theological claims and explore feminist, womanist, queer, and trans theological works on gender, sexuality, hermeneutics, and spirituality. The course will investigate these concepts considering a variety of faith traditions while using an intersectional lens of analysis.
 

GWS 600-001 (Same as PSY/SOC 779):  TOPICS IN GWS: PREJUDICE & INEQUALITY
INSTRUCTOR: JENN HUNT
W 3:30-6:00PM

In recent decades, there have been marked improvements in attitudes toward many groups that are stigmatized due to race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and other social identities. Nevertheless, considerable inequalities remain across social groups, subtle forms of discrimination thrive, and, in many cases, prejudice is still openly expressed. This course will attempt to understand this juxtaposition by examining theories of prejudice and inequality from different social science perspectives, including Psychology, Sociology, Gender Studies, Critical Race Theory, and Critical Whiteness Studies. First, we will consider theories on the nature of contemporary prejudice to understand why biases related to race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. persist, how prejudices against different groups are similar and different, and how intersectional oppression occurs. Second, we will consider how pervasive inequality and discrimination occurs at both individual and structural levels and how those experiences affect members of targeted groups. We also will examine how members of dominant groups, especially White people, form group-based identities and understand their experiences of privilege. Third, we will analyze different approaches – both good and bad – to reducing prejudice and promoting meaningful rather than rhetorical equality. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate.

GWS 600-002:  TOPICS IN GWS:  TRANSNATIONAL FEMINISMS
INSTRUCTOR:  ELIZABETH WILLIAMS
M 4:00-6:30PM

This course will examine texts from a variety of geographic locations to ask how feminisms operate differently across space and time. We will look critically at the legacies of imperialism, slavery, capitalism, and globalization and how they have impacted issues of gender and sexuality. We will also consider how indigenous hierarchies-- including ethnicity, caste, and religion--intersect with global feminist movements. Throughout the course, we will attend to the following questions: To what extent are ideas about feminism translatable across geographic space and political context? How can feminist scholars located in the West avoid reasserting global inequalities? How can you add or strengthen transnational perspectives in your own teaching and research? This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate. This course counts as the cross-cultural requirement for the GWS graduate certificate.

GWS 603-201:  GENDER, BODIES, AND HEALTH
INSTRUCTOR:  MELISSA STEIN 
PART OF TERM COURSE:  OCT 18-DEC 17 (online, asynchronous)

Health care reform is in the news every day, and everyone has an opinion on why the system is broken, how to fix it, who should have access to good medical care, under what circumstances, and what constitutes “good care” in the first place. This online, multi-format course will consider what it has meant to be a good patient or a good doctor at various points in American history, who was included—and excluded—in each group, how medicine became professionalized, the meanings ascribed to human bodies across time and social contexts, and how people have organized around issues of individual or public health. As such, it will be organized around topical units within the gendered history of medicine and health in the United States, each containing several readings and a film. Students will interactively engage with a range of primary sources, watch presentations and related films, have the opportunity to ask the professor questions and seek assistance during designated virtual “office hours” via Skype, and participate in online moderated discussions of the assigned readings and films, and at the end of each unit, of the questions it raised about gender, bodies, and health. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate.
 

ENG 651: 21ST CENTURY FEMINISMS AND EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE
INSTRUCTOR: MARION RUST
R 2:00-4:30PM

This course approaches a range of early American texts through the lens of late 20th and early 21st-century intersectional feminist discourse in order to shed new light on old work as well as reflect upon the relevance of early American narrative to our present world. It pairs recent theoretical and critical readings with a variety of works produced in “the long early America.” Literary texts may include: poetry by elite settler colonialist Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) and enslaved Black celebrity Phillis Wheatley (1753–1784); novels such as the pseudonymously authored The Female American: or, The Adventures of Unca Eliza Winkfield (1767), Leonora Sansay’s Secret History; or the Horrors of St. Domingo (1808), Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig: Sketches from the Life of a Free Black (1859), and Elizabeth Keckley’s Behind the Scenes, Or, Thirty Years and Slave, and Four Years in the White House (1868); and nonfiction by late 18th-century midwife Martha Ballard, early 19th-century Methodist political and religious leader William Apess (Pequot), and mid-19th-century abolitionist women’s rights advocate Sojourner Truth. Some feminist theory, such as Kate Manne’s Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (2018) and Carol Pateman’s The Sexual Contract (1988) assigned in conjunction with Charles Mill’s The Racial Contract (2014), will bear only indirectly on early American literature. Other feminist criticism, such as Marisa Fuentes’ Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive, Samantha Pinto’s Infamous Bodies: Early Black Women’s Celebrity and the Afterlives of Rights, UK English Professor Nazera Wright’s Black Girlhood in the Nineteenth Century, and Lisa Brooks’ Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War, will engage our primary reading directly. This seminar will be useful to students preparing for teaching positions in American Literature, Gender and Women’s Studies, African American and Africana Studies, and Native American and Indigenous Studies. It will also allow for original research making use of the expansive early American digital archive. Historicist and aesthetic approaches will be intertwined throughout the course – more accurately, they will be treated as inextricable. Assignments include a final research paper and willingness to lead one class session.

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