Fall Courses

 

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. There may also be GWS courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.
 
FALL 2022 COURSES
 

GWS 600-001: TOPICS IN GWS:  GENDER, RACE, AND MEMORY
INSTRUCTOR: MELISSA STEIN
MEETING TIMES:  W 6:00-8:30

This course will interrogate the politics of memory, an issue with considerable contemporary resonance and urgency—including contestations over history curriculum in U.S. schools, the removal of confederate statues, efforts to combat Holocaust denial, legislation to ban critical race theory, and the creation of markers at sites associated with slavery such as the Take Back Cheapside movement here in Lexington, to name just a few examples. It will consider how we remember—or forget, bury, or deny—difficult moments from our collective histories, and the ways that the present shapes our interpretations of and narratives about the past, particularly in regard to race and gender. Other topics include generational trauma and epigenetics, the gendered politics of the archive, and public memory.   This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate.

GWS 630-001:  FEMINIST RESEARCH METHODS
INSTRUCTOR:  SRIMATI BASU
MEETING TIMES:  M 5:00-7:30

How do we gather and produce knowledge, and how do we hold ourselves accountable for this knowledge? What constitutes feminist methodology, and what is its relationship to intersectional, decolonizing and queer methodologies? In this graduate seminar, we explore questions of epistemology, ethics and method by a. reading theoretical texts and debates; b. evaluating examples of particular methods including surveys, participant observation, ethnography, discourse and sensory processes; and c. applying your knowledge of these techniques to design a semester-long project where you gather data through participant observation, interviews and other methods of your choice and analyze the data and your methods in a final paper. This course is required for GWS PhD students.

GWS 650-001:  FEMINIST THEORY
INSTRUCTOR: ANASTASIA TODD
MEETING TIMES:  T 3:30-6:00

What is feminist theory? What makes theory feminist? This graduate seminar traces the broad terrain of feminist theory, focusing in on contemporary debates, discourses, and themes. Students will learn to think with and through a broad range of feminist theoretical orientations, from Black feminist theory to feminist disability studies. This course also considers how developments in queer theory and trans studies have informed feminist thinking and theorizing. Students will cultivate a broad understanding of the multiplicity of feminist theoretical frameworks, debate their usefulness, and have the opportunity to apply these different theoretical and epistemological approaches to their own research. This course is required for GWS PhD and GWS graduate certificate students.

 

ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT
 

FR 606: LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES: HAPPILY EVER AFTER? LOVE AT THE ROYAL COURT
INSTRUCTOR:  JULIE HUMAN
MEETING TIMES: M 3:30-6:00

This course focuses on the twelfth-century French romances of Chrétien de Troyes and on the rich feminist scholarship that explores the medieval courtly love tradition.  Primary texts include Erec et EnideCligès, Le Chevalier de la Charrette, Le Chevalier au Lion, and Le Conte du Graal. Students will also explore modern adaptations of medieval texts and will have the opportunity to present their research in the form of a conference paper at the end of the semester.

HIS 650-002: GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND POWER IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 
INSTRUCTOR: F. CHASSEN-LÓPEZ 
MEETING TIMES:  THURS 5:00-7:30

This course will challenge students to think critically, and examine their own assumptions, with respect to the relationship between gender, sexuality, and power within and across cultures, in distinct historical periods from the “gender panic” of the 1700s to the present. Given Joan Scott’s premise that gender is “a primary way of signifying relationships of power” and Dorinda Outram’s that “it is impossible to write about the body without also writing about power,” we will place gender, sexuality, and power, and their intersection with factors such as class, race, ethnicity, and nationality, in the center of our analysis in order to address key topics such as slavery, masculinity, birth control, colonialism/imperialism, war and sexual violence, genocide, queer history, and trans history as well as the pertinent theoretical and methodological debates. We will interrogate how intersecting systems of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, homophobia, and transphobia (etc.) shape experience and the way people resist oppression. This course will count toward the cross-cultural requirement for the GWS graduate certificate. 

SPA 685:  US Latina/x Cultural Politics
INSTRUCTOR:  DIERDRE REBER
MEETING TIMES:  WED, 4:30-7:00PM
We will study a wide range of US Latina/x figures and texts in diverse spheres, to be discussed and selected together as a class, possibly including: revolutionaries past and activists present (Lolita Lebrón of the Puerto Rican independence movement, Dolores Huerta of United Farm Workers, Lorella Praeli of the DREAMers), appointed and elected officials (Sonia Sotomayor, AOC, Mayra Flores); LGBTQIA2S+ activists and community members (Sylvia Rivera of the NYC Stonewall era, House of Xtravaganza and ballroom culture, Mj /Michaela Jaé Rodriguez and Pose), pop culture, especially the 80s and the “Latin explosion” (Lisa Lisa, Sheila E, Gloria Estefan, Rosie Perez, JLo), coming-of-age young adult fiction (Sandra Cisneros, Erika L. Sánchez, Elizabeth Acevedo), experimental/science/speculative fiction (Lilliam Rivera, Malka Older, Carmen María Machado), cinema/television (the two Anitas of Rita Moreno and Ariana DeBose in West Side Story, América Ferrera from Patricia Cardoso’s Real Women Have Curves to executive producing the Netflix series Gentefied, and director Aurora Guerrero from Mosquita y Mari to Hamilton mixtape videography and Ava DuVernay’s Queen Sugar all-female directorial team), and cultural criticism/theory (Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Latina feminist theory anthology).  Our central push will be to develop our own theoretical models of Latina/x cultural politics of belonging, focusing especially on tactics of the body, autobiographical narratives of lived experience; expressions of ideology and political and/or economic values; the relationship of the self to ambition, aggression, force, violence, as well as solidarity, comfort, safety, and peace; the role and significance of family and home, and how those conceptual categories overlap with nation and country; the complex relationship between countr/ies of origin and of belonging and the differences between legal and cultural citizenship.  Emphasis will be on participatory teaching and learning, including course structure and content, with frequent opportunities for informal critical writing and a final analytical project to be determined as a class.