Fall Courses

 

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. There may also be GWS courses listed under the general "A&S" prefix or as Discovery Seminar Program "DSP" courses. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.
 
GWS Graduate Course Descriptions for Fall 2020:

You can print out a copy of the course flier here
 

GWS 600-001 (Same as ST 690):  TOPICS IN GWS: BODIES, HEALTH, AND DEBILITY
INSTRUCTOR: ANASTASIA TODD/NARI SENANAYAKE     M 2:00-4:30PM

We live in a moment where struggles over health and bodies are ubiquitous. Recent research, for instance, has examined these struggles under conditions of global climate change, resource conflict, mass displacement and detention, extrajudicial killings of black and brown bodies and life under military occupation. In this course, we explore the potential of debility - as both a concept and lived experience - to extend these scholarly conversations. We position debility as a conceptual thread that cuts across the seminar and allows us to envision a productive interdisciplinary collaboration between health geography and feminist disability studies. Across these literatures, the seminar will pay close attention to how race, gender, class, nation, sexuality, and ability shape which bodies (both human and non-human) are rehabilitatable, which bodies are marked as contagious or toxic and in need of containment, and which bodies are consequently rendered disposable. Through this course, we ask: What is the utility of debility, as a theoretical intervention, to conceptualize the ways in which the body lives, labors, and copes under the conditions of neoliberal capitalism and toxic pollution? And, how do race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship come together to create uneven access to “health,” both material and imagined, for some bodies more than others? This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate.

GWS 602-201:  PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER AND SEXUAL IDENTITIES
INSTRUCTOR:  MELISSA STEIN  (ONLINE/DISTANCE LEARNING)

Gender identities and sexual identities, especially LGBTQ identities, will be examined in this interdisciplinary course. Topics include the history of sexual and gender identities; politics of sexuality, sexual identities, and transgender identities; the role of activism in political and cultural change; psychology of identity formation; forms of oppression, including heterosexism, homonegativity, and transphobia; and representations in art, media, and literature. Throughout this course, we will pay attention to the ways sexual and gender identities intersect with other identities, including race, ethnicity, class, (dis)ability, and other cultural categories. Students will work towards a deeper understanding of the dynamics of privilege and oppression related to LGBTQ individuals and culture by exploring lived experiences.  This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate, PhD, and other degrees as appropriate.

GWS 630-001:  FEMINIST RESEARCH METHODS
INSTRUCTOR:  SRIMATI BASU     R 4:00-6:30PM

How do we gather and produce knowledge, and how do we hold ourselves accountable for this knowledge? What constitutes feminist methodology, and what is its relationship to intersectional, decolonizing and queer methodologies? In this graduate seminar, we explore questions of epistemology, ethics and method by reading theoretical texts and debates; evaluating examples of particular methods including surveys, participant observation, ethnography, discourse and visual sources; and applying your knowledge of these techniques to design a semester-long project where you gather data through participant observation, interviews and other methods of your choice and analyze the data and your methods in a final paper. This course is required for students pursuing a PhD in GWS and counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.

GWS 650-001:  FEMINIST THEORY
INSTRUCTOR:  CHARLIE ZHANG     T 4:00-6:30PM

This advanced seminar is designed as an intellectual exercise of learning to evaluate the methods and theories that feminist scholars from various backgrounds utilize to develop their analysis of social systems of inequalities. Students will develop a solid theoretical foundation for critical inquiry of issues key to the field of women, gender, and sexuality studies. These issues include (but are not limited to) the critical concepts of gender and women, identities and intersectionality, politics of knowledge production, women’s rights, colonialism, postcolonialism and neocolonialism, solidarity, decolonization and indigeneity, science and technology, nationalism and transnationalism, globalization and neoliberalism, labor, migration, and economic inequalities. We will read a selection of core theoretical essays and monographs, examine the social and historical background of different theoretical developments, understand their political connotations, and evaluate their analytical strengths and weaknesses. This course is required for students pursuing a PhD in GWS and counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.

ADDITIONAL GWS RELATED COURSES

A&S 600:  PERSPECTIVES ON DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
INSTRUCTOR:  CRISTINA ALCALDE
PART OF TERM (FIRST 8 WEEKS OF FALL SEMESTER) ONLINE COURSE

This 8-week course introduces students to meanings, practices, and theories connected to diversity and inclusion, and the implications of these within an increasingly interconnected world. The course approaches diversity and inclusion as central to professional and societal well- being and success. Students will critically examine the ways in which power, privilege, oppression, diversity, and inclusion inform everyday lives, organizations, institutions, and societies. Students will engage with multiple perspectives on human differences through multidisciplinary lenses to increase their awareness and understanding of the varied ways in which social identities and cultural beliefs inform social and professional settings on an individual basis and systemically.
This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and the Diversity and Inclusion certificate
 

HIS 563: WOMEN IN LATIN AMERICA
INSTRUCTOR:  F.R CHASSEN-LOPEZ         TR 2:00-3:15PM

Although Latin America is famous as the land of machismo, this stereotype is changing and ten women have already served as president in different countries. The paintings of Frida Kahlo go for the highest price of any female artist in all of the Americas. The seventeenth-century Mexican nun, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, was the hemisphere’s pioneer in the struggle for women’s rights and the Argentine mothers of the Plaza de Mayo were instrumental in the overthrow of a military dictatorship. Using a variety of texts (readings, videos, testimonials, literary works, biographies, and film), we will analyze gender relations south of the border iin order to understand how people’s lives have changed over time.

 

PHI 715-001:  SEMINAR IN RECENT PHILOSOPHY: SCIENCE AND VALUES
INSTRUCTOR:  JULIA BURSTEN                 R 4:30-7:00PM

Scientific knowledge is often seen as objective, disinterested, and protected from influence by outside pressures: force equals mass times acceleration, whether we like it or not and regardless of what politics and policies say. Laws of nature are generally understood to be inviolable, unlike human laws. But, like any human activity, science is shaped by the people who make it, from the selection of research questions and design of experiments to the ways that science is and isn’t used in policy-making and other areas of human life. In this seminar, we will explore the complex interplay between science and values through the lens of contemporary history and philosophy of science. We will begin with the feminist critique of science, which looks to the many ways that women have been historically and presently excluded as both subjects and practitioners of science. Then we will look at the different ways that objectivity can be understood in light of the contingent and value-laden history of scientific progress. We will close with student-selected contemporary topics in science and values research, such as inductive risk, the possibility of value-free science, the relationship between anti-science attitudes and the value-ladenness of science, and the roles for values in particular areas of scientific practice. This course will count toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.  

 

 

 

 

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